I'm a young body with an old soul. I love medieval history, vintage clothing, and oldies music. I'm all about classic movies, British television, period dramas, and beautiful music. Expect posts about my passions, which include tap dancing, classic Hollywood, music, Disney, Harry Potter, Merlin, Sherlock, Doctor Who, musicals, Starkid, Marvel, Once Upon a Time, and the Beatles.



ohrobbybaby:

Movies 2014
#24 - Holiday Inn (1942)
Director: Mark Sandrich
Starring:  Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Marjorie Reynolds

ohrobbybaby:

Movies 2014

#24 - Holiday Inn (1942)

DirectorMark Sandrich

Starring:  Bing CrosbyFred AstaireMarjorie Reynolds


barbarastanwyck:

Easter Parade (1948)


haroldlloyds:

Songs Introduced by Fred Astaire

A Needle in a Haystack  (1934) - Herb Magidson & Con Conrad

Not originally in the stage production of The Gay Divorce, A Needle in a Haystack was written specifically for the film adaptation (retitled The Gay Divorcee). Most of the original songs from the stage production were left out of the film, with the exception of Cole Porter’s Night and Day. The number provided Fred with an opportunity to show off his unique talent and charm in his first starring feature. 


lvndcity:

Fred Astaire y Ginger Rogers by sergiparra (2010)
Prague, Czech Republic

lvndcity:

Fred Astaire y Ginger Rogers by sergiparra (2010)

Prague, Czech Republic


ohrobbybaby:

Favorite Musical Numbers 

Dancing in the Dark from “The Band Wagon”  (1953) 


astairical:

Headcanons // The Gay Divorcee (1934) & On the Beach (1959).

After Guy and Mimi’s happy marriage, they return to America, dancing together on Broadway. Egbert and Hortnese choose to remain in England, and the former finally takes over his father’s law firm. Life is swell for the two couples - Guy and Mimi are madly in love with each other, and there is no denying it. But their world comes crashing down on them upon the declaration of war in 1939. Guy hastily abandons his dancing career in order to serve in the Royal Air Force, despite being an American citizen, since his parents were both British and he feels a sense of duty towards England as well. Mimi is powerless to stop him, but he comforts her and assures her the war will be over like that. “We’ll lick ‘em within two months. Just you watch - and then we’ll be back to Broadway and hoofing and everything that you love." Guy reassures his wife with a smile. Mimi decides to move to London so that she’ll be closer to him, Egbert and Hortnese.

He cannot be more wrong. The war draws on for years, and with every bomb that drops in England, he is determined to drop two in Germany. The mindless killing starts to distort’s Guy’s personality - he’s not the sweet (if a bit sassy at times) hoofer that he used to be. He is concerned only with pounding the enemy; practically bombing their cities flat. Guy’s vengeful behavior finally comes back to hit him, through a bombing raid one night in 1942. Mimi, who is at the post office, sending a telegram to him, is caught in it. No one knows if she died instantaneously or if she was trapped under the debris for days, but to Guy, it doesn’t really matter. She was his beloved, his everything, essentially, his reason for living.

He continues on with the bombing missions, even more spitefully than before. When Guy returns for a two-day leave, Egbert and Hortnese notice how much he has changed. He’s bitter, cynical, and lost in his thoughts about Mimi. He wants the war to be over, but then again, he doesn’t know what he is going to do after the fighting stops. Guy finally gets his wish and the Allies win, but at another heavy price - Egbert and Hortnese die in another bombing raid shortly before the war’s end in 1945.

Guy decides to give up performing as well, since it reminds him too much of Mimi. With that, he drops his stage name and goes back to the name he was given, Julian. Life is dull, until he hears about a nuclear weapons project. He moves to Australia and starts developing nuclear weapons with the other scientists. For the next fifteen years, he tries his best to forget about Mimi - that’s why he romances Moira, but it is to no avail. Her death leaves a void within Julian that can never be filled. Then, the Third World War breaks out. He wastes no time in getting with the nuclear weapons, trying to defend Australia.

That is what makes Julian’s monologue later on even more poignant and terrifying - he realizes that he was partially responsible for the death of humankind. He helps develop those weapons, and also to detonate some of them. It finally hits him when Peter talks about how much he cares for Mary. Sure, Peter’s spot is tough, but it also reminds Julian of Mimi. All the people he ever cared for are gone, and soon, he’s going to join them, too. He buys the Ferrari and decides to race the car only because it reminds him of his second meeting with Mimi - the way he had chased her in his car. Focusing on the car also helps Julian ignore another mortifying thought that haunts him through his last days. He realizes that he was bitter all his life over what happened to the people he cared for - but then again, he had done the same to other people living in Germany. Those bombs that Julian dropped undoubtedly separated families, torn lovers apart, and wrecked homes. Not to mention the nuclear weapons that he built. All because he blindly thought he was taking revenge for his wife.

It is no surprise, then, that Julian’s last thoughts are of Mimi. The Ferrari is a representation of her - something that he can connect with his past. As his fingers run across the surface of the car for one last time, he recalls the way he shamelessly flirted with her on that country road in England all those years ago. His life could have been so much more - he could’ve had all of Broadway and West End at his and Mimi’s feet, but the war ruined everything. Every prospect he ever had. The irony lies in the fact that Julian wanted to join the war of his own accord.

But he tries not to think of those thoughts as he climbs into the car. Not of what could have been, but what might be. He smiles, hoping that he’ll finally be reunited with Mimi again.


posted 19 hours ago with 27 notes
- via astairical

I guess I better tell you my dream.





Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire in Carefree (1938)

Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire in Carefree (1938)



aliciahubermans:

screen couples: Fred Astaire & Eleanor Powell: Broadway Melody of 1940

"She ‘put ‘em down like a man’ no ricky-ticky-sissy stuff with Ellie. She really knocked out a tap dance in a class by herself. […] I had 29 dance partners… I could hold my own with 28 of them..I met my match with Ellie. No male dancer can keep up with her and it was apparent to me she should be featured in solos."

Fred Astaire


"Were you ever anxious to dance with a man you dreamed you danced with"


thomasdestry:

Movies Watched in 2011 | Follow the Fleet (1936)


posted 1 week ago with 126 notes
- via thomasdestry