I'm a young body with an old soul. I love medieval history, vintage clothing, and oldies music. I'm all about classic movies, British television, period dramas, and beautiful music. Expect posts about my passions, which include tap dancing, classic Hollywood, music, Disney, Harry Potter, Merlin, Sherlock, Doctor Who, musicals, Starkid, Marvel, Once Upon a Time, and the Beatles.




Marlon Brando photographed by Ed Clark,1949.

Marlon Brando photographed by Ed Clark,1949.



Simply put, in film acting, there is before Brando, and there is after Brando. And they are like different worlds. - Rick Lyman, The New York Times 

Simply put, in film acting, there is before Brando, and there is after Brando. And they are like different worlds. - Rick Lyman, The New York Times 


msmildred:

Marlon Brando

msmildred:

Marlon Brando



Marlon Brando and Marilyn Monroe photographed by Milton Greene, 1955.

Marlon Brando and Marilyn Monroe photographed by Milton Greene, 1955.



paddyfitz:

ava—gardner:

ava—gardner:

Marlon Brando in a screen test for “Rebel without a cause”


terrysmalloy:

Happy birthday Marlon Brando!
Born Marlon Brando, Jr.
April 3, 1924 - July 4, 2004

    “To the end of his life, Marlon Brando insisted that he had done nothing special. In his view acting was a trade like plumbing or baking. The only difference was that he played characters instead of unclogging drains or kneading loaves of bread. This was not false modesty; he believed in what he said. But what believed was untrue.
    There was screen acting before Brando and after Brando, just as there was painting before Picasso and after Picasso and writing before Hemingway and after Hemingway and popular singing before Sinatra and after Sinatra, and even the casual observer can tell the difference. As film historian Molly Haskell pointed out, the film star’s legend “is written in one word. BRANDO. Like Garbo. Or Fido. An animal, a force of nature, an element; not a human being who must, as a member of society, distinguish himself from other members with a christian name and initial as well as a surname. There is only one Brando.
    …From his debut film, The Men, in 1950, Brando worked without a mask. The inner wounds were manifest, and the risks he took- doing anything, no matter how outlandish or unflattering, to make a character credible- had never been attempted by a Hollywood star. His predecessors drew a line between their private lives and their movie roles. No such boundary existed between Brando the actor and Brando the man. They were one and the same: complicated, dangerous, vulnerable. That, too, was different.
    …When Brando first appeared, he shook up screen acting in a way that had not been seen since performers were given voices in 1927. His work had been sedulously imitated by performers for more than half a century. Those actors have unwittingly obscured the contributions of the man who started it all… Marlon was the first to show a profound vulnerability beneath the male exterior, as well as a willingness to depart from the script not out of perversity or an inability to remember his lines, but because he was going for the truth of the character at that moment. 
    Along comes Brando, and an art form is transfigured.”

-Somebody: The Reckless Life and Remarkable Career of Marlon Brando, Stefan Kanfer



Moody, mumbly, Omaha-born maestro of method acting….Earliest career goal: to be a minister….First big break: being cast as brutish, T-shirted Stanley Kowalski in Broadway’s A Streetcar Named Desire….Second break: his nose, while horsing around backstage….Worst critique to a co-star: “You have black hair in your nostrils” (to Sophia Loren)….Cheekiest prank: While making The Godfather, Brando joined James Caan and Robert Duvall in a mooning contest while riding around Manhattan in a limo….Best fake-out:  Once drove down Sunset Boulevard in  a convertible with a trick arrow “through” his skull….True confession:  “Why should anybody care what a movie star has to say?  A movie star is nothing important.”  —People magazine

Moody, mumbly, Omaha-born maestro of method acting….Earliest career goal: to be a minister….First big break: being cast as brutish, T-shirted Stanley Kowalski in Broadway’s A Streetcar Named Desire….Second break: his nose, while horsing around backstage….Worst critique to a co-star: “You have black hair in your nostrils” (to Sophia Loren)….Cheekiest prank: While making The Godfather, Brando joined James Caan and Robert Duvall in a mooning contest while riding around Manhattan in a limo….Best fake-out:  Once drove down Sunset Boulevard in  a convertible with a trick arrow “through” his skull….True confession:  “Why should anybody care what a movie star has to say?  A movie star is nothing important.”  —People magazine


Marlon Brando as Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Directed by Elia Kazan.


msmildred:

Marlon Brando

msmildred:

Marlon Brando


Marlon Brando photographed by Edward Clark on the set of The Men, 1949.


msmildred:

Marlon Brando

msmildred:

Marlon Brando



I had a great conflict about going to the Academy Awards and accepting an Oscar. I never believed that the accomplishment was more important than the effort. I remember being driven to the Awards still wondering whether I should have put on my tuxedo. I finally thought, what the hell; people want to express their thanks, and if it is a big deal for them, why not go? I have since altered my opinion about awards in general, and will never again accept one of any kind. This doesn’t mean that what other people believe has any less validity; many people I  know and care about believe that awards are valuable and involve themselves in the process of the Academy Awards and others. I don’t look down upon them for doing so, and I hope that they don’t look down upon me. - Marlon Brando

I had a great conflict about going to the Academy Awards and accepting an Oscar. I never believed that the accomplishment was more important than the effort. I remember being driven to the Awards still wondering whether I should have put on my tuxedo. I finally thought, what the hell; people want to express their thanks, and if it is a big deal for them, why not go? I have since altered my opinion about awards in general, and will never again accept one of any kind. This doesn’t mean that what other people believe has any less validity; many people I  know and care about believe that awards are valuable and involve themselves in the process of the Academy Awards and others. I don’t look down upon them for doing so, and I hope that they don’t look down upon me. - Marlon Brando


Marlon Brando photographed by Serge Balkin, 1948.


Marlon Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire. (1951)