I'm a young body with an old soul. I love medieval history, vintage clothing, and oldies music. I'm all about classic movies, British television, period dramas, and beautiful music. Expect posts about my passions, which include tap dancing, classic Hollywood, music, Disney, Harry Potter, Merlin, Sherlock, Doctor Who, musicals, Starkid, Marvel, Once Upon a Time, and the Beatles.



Never gonna dance, only gonna love you, never gonna dance.


aliciahubermans:

screen couples: Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers: Swing TIme

"Of course, Ginger was able to accomplish sex through dance. We told more through our movements instead of the big clinch. We did it all in the dance."

Fred Astaire



astairical:

Swing time, swing time, all musical guys have crowned it king

Right up to their eyes, they’re drowned in

Swing time, swing time…

The Waltz in Swing Time, composed by Jerome Kern, is considered by many to be the best piece of music that Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers have ever danced to. The score combines classical elements and 1930’s swing influences, which Astaire insisted upon. He wanted some of the numbers in the movie to actually “swing”, like the title, but Kern was reluctant to compose in that style. Despite the composer’s own doubts, the result is still spectacular, 77 years later. The scene and atmosphere are the epitome of elegance and the dance personifies the young love between Astaire and Rogers. They are both dressed impeccably, with Astaire wearing a creative variation of the black tie outfit, and Rogers in another one of her stunning ballroom gowns. The dance itself, choreographed by Astaire and Hermes Pan, blends tap, ballroom and ballet, and it is also one of many occasions in which Ginger Rogers shows her incredible dancing abilities. It is evident in this dance that she contributed her whole fifty percent to the partnership. Astaire choreographed it, but she executed it in high heels and a dress. As many have stated before, Rogers contributed her own ideas for the dances and thought on the same level as her partner. This, combined with the two performers’ ability to put romance on the screen through pantomime, makes the scene rise above average. Astaire and Rogers poured all their effort into this; one can only wonder how many hours of rehearsal it took for a dance that lasted two and a half minutes on celluloid. At the same time, it is truly a blessing that this dancing excellence has been captured on camera, and that generations to come will be able to see this masterpiece as many times as they want to.


posted 3 weeks ago with 163 notes
- via astairical

ohrobbybaby:

 Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Swing Time (1936)



gingerrogerss:

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Swing Time (1936)

gingerrogerss:

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Swing Time (1936)




i-wontdance:

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in SWING TIME  dancing to the song “Pick yourself up”.

This is the first true number that Fred & Ginger danced together in.

http://iwontdance.com

"Pick yourself up" by Jerome Kern was introduced by Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. Ginger plays a dance instructor whom Fred follows into her studio; he pretends to have "two left feet" in order to get her to dance with him. Fred sings the verse to her and she responds with the chorus. After an interlude, they dance to the tune.


posted 1 month ago with 178 notes
- via i-wontdance

gingerrogerss:

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in a publicity still for the film Swing Time (1936)

gingerrogerss:

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in a publicity still for the film Swing Time (1936)


wehadfacesthen:

Never gonna dance, only gonna love you, never gonna dance.

They were beautiful perfection, la perfectly swell romance….

Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Swing Time (George Stevens, 1937)


1930sglamourandstyle:

Fred and Ginger dancing to Jerome Kern’s Waltz in Swing Time. 1936

1930sglamourandstyle:

Fred and Ginger dancing to Jerome Kern’s Waltz in Swing Time. 1936


Throughout Swing Time, when Fred Astaire danced with Ginger Rogers, a signature step was used. A step that was taught to Astaire’s character, Lucky, by Roger’s character, Penny. This signature step applies to the relationship between Lucky and Penny throughout the entire film. If you notice between each gif, the step is used in different ways. Ways that signify the relationship at that point in the film.